SPIRITS : Supporting Program for Interaction-based Initiative Team Studies  2020-2021 Interdisciplinary type project, in the priority area of humanities and social sciences
京都大学 SPIRITS

Events

The 1st Workshop

Dynamism of Social Context Deciphered by a Linguistic Analysis of Ancient Literature

Friday, February 12, 2021, 14:00 – 19:10 (JST)

The project will be held online.

The first workshop of SPIRITS project “Chronological and Geographical Features of Ancient Indian Literature Explored by Data-Driven Science”

2020-2021 Interdisciplinary type project, in the priority area of humanities and social sciences SPIRITS: Supporting Program for Interaction-based Initiative Team Studies

Flyer Download (PDF 1.6MB)

Part 1

14:00 – 14:30 Opening:
Problems in the Formation of the Vedas, Ancient Indian Religious Texts
Kyoko Amano (Kyoto University, Institute for Research in Humanities / Hakubi Center)
14:30 – 15:10
The Possibility of Information Visualization and Data Analysis for Ancient India
Literature
Hiroaki Natsukawa (Kyoto University, Kyoto University, Academic Center for Computing and Media Studies)
15:10 – 15:50
Relationship Among Vedic Schools Deciphered by the Visualization of Mantra Collocation
Kyoko Amano (Kyoto University, Institute for Research in Humanities /
Hakubi Center)
15:50 – 16:30
Citation Prediction Using Academic Paper Data and Application for Surveys
Shun Hamachi (Kyoto University, Graduate School of Engineering)

Part 2

16:50 – 17:30
Measuring the Semantic Similarity between the Chapters of Taittirīya Saṃhitā using a Vector Space Model
Yuki Kyogoku(Leipzig University, Indology)
17:30 – 18:10
Dating Vedic texts with computational models: Algorithmic considerations and data selection
Oliver Hellwig (University of Zurich, Department of Comparative Language Science)
18:10 – 18:50
morogram: Background, History, and Purpose of a Tool for East Asian Text Analysis
Shigeki Moro (Hanazono University, Faculty of Letter)
18:50 – 19:10
Discussion (Moderator: Hiroaki Natsukawa)

Understanding the social background of text formation is a basic requirement to accurately understand documents. However, the background of ancient societies is often hidden in a veil of mystery, which makes it difficult to understand the process of text formation. The Vedas, religious texts in Ancient India, are among these documents. In this workshop, we will seek to decipher the social movements, geographical mobility, and change in the spheres of influence in ancient India through a language analysis of the Vedic texts. The discussion will include how data science can be applied to this field.

Please register using the following Google Form. The Zoom Meeting ID and password will be sent to you by e-mail.
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeNx3IFvRFzyAVnDG_FS0T2YesKgbC7T24XmNv47W_Sa_Qm9g/viewform

Registration is available untill the end of the workshop.
No registrant limit. No registration fee.

Organizer: SPIRITS project “Chronological and Geographical Features of Ancient Indian Literature Explored by Data-Driven Science” (Kyoko Amano, Hiroaki Natsukawa, Oliver Hellwig, Yuki Kyogoku)

Co-Organizer: Kyoto University, Academic Center for Computing and Media Studies; Kyoko Amano Hakubi Project “Language and Social-Cultural Background of the Ancient Indian Ritual Literature”; Grant-in-Aid for Challenging Research (Exploratory) “Constructing a Database for Quantitative Analysis of Style Toward Elucidation of the Formation Process of Ancient Indian Texts” (Representative researcher: Kyoko Amano, 20K20697)

Oliver Hellwig

Title: Dating Vedic texts with computational models: Algorithmic considerations and data selection

Text: In spite of over 150 years of scholarly research, the chronology of the Vedic corpus is still far from being well understood as external historical evidence is largely missing and post-Rigvedic Sanskrit shows only minor developments on the levels of phonetics and morph-syntax.

This presentation discusses mathematical models that can be used for dating (Vedic) texts based on the linguistic evidence they provide. It also addresses the important questions of how to select expressive linguistic features, i.e. those whose distribution is coupled with the time of composition; and how to interpret the parameters of the resulting models in a linguistic context. The discussions are exemplified by a corpus of classical and medieval Latin texts which show comparable linguistic developments, but can, in contrast, be dated exactly, thereby facilitating model evaluation.